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| NCCD

Girls and women represent growing segments of the justice-involved population. Justice-involved girls and women have distinct challenges—such as high levels of trauma, abuse, family issues, substance use, and mental health issues—that need specialized treatment and intervention.

| NCCD

The fall issue of SDM News covers all things conference—the NCCD Conference on Children, Youth, and Families.

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

This report outlines how the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services used an actuarial screening assessment, developed in collaboration with NCCD, to classify youth in the child welfare system by their likelihood of subsequent juvenile justice involvement. This enables the county to focus prevention service programming on youth at highest risk of dual-system involvement. NCCD found that youth who received prevention services had lower rates of juvenile justice involvement than those who did not; however, these findings are considered preliminary due to data limitations. 

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

This document presents highlights of NCCD's Profile of Youth in the Los Angeles County Delinquency Prevention Pilot, which outlines how the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services used an actuarial screening assessment, developed in collaboration with NCCD, to classify youth in the child welfare system by their likelihood of subsequent juvenile justice involvement. This enables the county to focus prevention service programming on youth at highest risk of dual-system involvement. NCCD found that youth who received prevention services had lower rates of juvenile justice involvement than those who did not; however, these findings are considered preliminary due to data limitations. The full report can be found here.

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

The Structured Decision Making® (SDM) model for juvenile justice, a group of standardized assessments developed by NCCD, identifies the risk levels of system-involved young people and helps judges determine their best disposition options in court. These assessments also help courts place youth in the least restrictive environments needed to ensure public safety. NCCD has developed this judicial guide to address the needs and concerns of judges around decision points in the juvenile justice system. Other juvenile justice stakeholders will also find useful information on decision points, adolescent development research, and best practices.

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

The September newsletter announces the launch of the new SafeMeasures® website; Texas CPS adopts the SDM® system; Dr. Jesse Russell named Chief Program Officer; Jennifer Cotter named associate director of NCCD’s Children’s Research Center. *Note that the link opens slowly. Please be patient.

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

Research has demonstrated that structured decisions lead to better outcomes than those based on worker judgment alone.

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

Risk assessment is a core practice to promote safer communities and more successful youth.

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

A disposition matrix brings a greater degree of consistency, reliability, and equity to the assessment and decision-making process.

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

While the abstract concept of validity makes sense, actual testing for validity can be challenging. Because validity exists on a continuum, with degrees of less and more valid, we think of some tools as being more valid than others. This means that a test to determine which tools are most or least valid can be useful.

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

Disposition matrices help guide decisions, allow for more effective practice evaluation, and are powerful tools for helping systems achieve their goals.

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

Detention screening instruments inform the decision of whether or not to admit a youth into secure care while he or she awaits an initial custody hearing. The most common structure is a set of scored factors that sum to a recommendation. Not all instruments are scored, but that is the best structure for helping to achieve consistency and regularity. Based on the final score, detention screening instruments make recommendations to release the youth, release with conditions, or hold the youth in secure care.