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| NCCD

This handout concisely explains the benefits of the Structured Decision Making® (SDM) system for each level of an agency: leadership, managers and supervisors, workers, and families. Take a look at the handout and feel free to use it to help communicate SDM® system basics.

| Chris Baird

This is the second brief in the six-part series titled A Question of Evidence, Part Two. In this brief, Chris Baird explores the origins of claims that each succeeding “generation” of assessment models in the justice field offers greater “predictive” capacity to its users. Baird goes on to discuss the promotional strategies that led to widespread acceptance of the “generations” terminology and associated claims.

| NCCD

The January 2017 issue of NCCD News includes a video of the keynote address by Dr. William C. Bell at the 2016 NCCD Conference on Children, Youth, and Families; new staff to focus on community violence prevention; a new juvenile justice project in Texas; and more. *This link opens slowly; please be patient.

| Chris Baird

In the first of his six-part series of briefs titled A Question of Evidence, Part Two, Chris Baird explains his reasons for revisiting the topic of his 2009 paper, A Question of Evidence: A Critique of Risk Assessment Models in the Justice System. According to Baird, the issues addressed in his earlier paper “remain in force today, further complicated by increased expectations emanating from new methods of analysis.

| Estivaliz Castro, Caroline Glesmann

A recent NCCD study examined how and why girls become gang-affiliated and how and why some girls avoid or leave gang activity. The study includes information about addressing the needs of gang-involved/formerly gang-involved girls and recommends that services recognize the girls’ individuality and provide tailored plans that build on their strengths. This PowerPoint presentation summarizes the study.

| NCCD

Dr. William C. Bell, President and CEO of Casey Family Programs, at the NCCD Conference on Children, Youth, and Families

| NCCD

Dr. William C. Bell delivers the keynote address at the 2016 NCCD Conference on Children, Youth, and Families.

Kathy Park, CEO of NCCD, at the NCCD Conference on Children, Youth, and Families

| NCCD

CEO Kathy Park delivers opening remarks at the 2016 NCCD Conference on Children, Youth, and Families, discussing ethical and effective approaches to child welfare.

| NCCD

Girls and women represent growing segments of the justice-involved population. Justice-involved girls and women have distinct challenges—such as high levels of trauma, abuse, family issues, substance use, and mental health issues—that need specialized treatment and intervention.

| NCCD

The fall issue of SDM News covers all things conference—the NCCD Conference on Children, Youth, and Families.

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

This report outlines how the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services used an actuarial screening assessment, developed in collaboration with NCCD, to classify youth in the child welfare system by their likelihood of subsequent juvenile justice involvement. This enables the county to focus prevention service programming on youth at highest risk of dual-system involvement. NCCD found that youth who received prevention services had lower rates of juvenile justice involvement than those who did not; however, these findings are considered preliminary due to data limitations. 

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

This document presents highlights of NCCD's Profile of Youth in the Los Angeles County Delinquency Prevention Pilot, which outlines how the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services used an actuarial screening assessment, developed in collaboration with NCCD, to classify youth in the child welfare system by their likelihood of subsequent juvenile justice involvement. This enables the county to focus prevention service programming on youth at highest risk of dual-system involvement. NCCD found that youth who received prevention services had lower rates of juvenile justice involvement than those who did not; however, these findings are considered preliminary due to data limitations. The full report can be found here.