View/Filter Resources

Webinar: Pathways Girls Take to and Through the Juvenile Justice System

| NCCD

In this webinar, Dr. Erin Espinosa discusses her latest research on pathways to the juvenile justice system and how gender, mental health system involvement, and trauma affect those pathways.

| Caroline Glesmann | Vanessa Patino Lydia

A new brief in a four-part series related to girls in detention summarizes major findings and is designed to help inform policy that considers girls’ experiences in the juvenile justice system. To create the series—and the research it is based on—NCCD partnered with the Delores Barr Weaver Policy Center in Jacksonville, Florida, with support from the Jessie Ball duPont Fund. This brief, titled “Notes to the Field: Girls and Secure Juvenile Detention, Barriers, Opportunities, and Recommendations,” was developed in part to generate dialogue about the harm of systems and awareness of how resources used to incarcerate girls can be redirected to reduce future system involvement and help break the cycles of poverty and incarceration. All four briefs can be found on our website, here.

| NCCD and the Delores Barr Weaver Policy Center

A brief by NCCD and the Delores Barr Weaver Policy Center examines why girls arrested for domestic violence-related charges in Florida were not consistently assigned to domestic violence respite beds rather than secure detention. “Addressing Barriers to Using Respite Beds for Girls Charged With Domestic Violence” is the second brief by NCCD and the Delores Barr Weaver Policy Center—both supported by the Jessie Ball DuPont fund—about girls in secure detention in Florida. See the first brief here.

| NCCD and the Delores Barr Weaver Policy Center

NCCD has released a brief titled “Girls in Secure Detention in Florida” to provide insight on keeping girls who do not pose a public safety risk out of the juvenile justice system. With support from the Jessie Ball duPont Fund, NCCD partnered with the Delores Barr Weaver Policy Center in Jacksonville, Florida, to produce the brief--one of several publications released on September 25 with an emphasis on the need for prevention and early intervention services and strategies so girls do not become involved in Florida's juvenile justice system.

| Angie M. Wolf, PhD; Andrea Bogie; Estivaliz Castro; Caroline Glesmann; Aishatu Yusuf

This executive summary presents key findings from NCCD’s interviews with 114 gang-involved girls and young women in California from 2012 to 2015. The interviews were part of NCCD’s research into the individual, family, and community factors affecting girls’ experiences with and desistance from gangs and gang-related crime. The goals of NCCD’s study included identifying girls’ reasons for joining gangs, their experiences and activities related to gang involvement, and their motivations and strategies for transitioning away from gangs. The summary also provides recommendations for practitioners, policymakers, and others who are interested in improving outcomes for gang-involved girls.

| Angie M. Wolf, PhD; Caroline Glesmann

NCCD has published a brief that draws on data from NCCD’s interviews with 114 gang-involved girls and young women in California, with a focus on interview participants’ social supports. The interviews were part of NCCD’s research into the individual, family, and community factors affecting girls’ experiences with and desistance from gangs and gang-related crime. The goals of NCCD’s study, conducted from 2012 to 2015, included identifying girls’ reasons for joining gangs, their experiences and activities related to gang involvement, and their motivations and strategies for transitioning away from gangs.

| Estivaliz Castro, Caroline Glesmann

A recent NCCD study examined how and why girls become gang-affiliated and how and why some girls avoid or leave gang activity. The study includes information about addressing the needs of gang-involved/formerly gang-involved girls and recommends that services recognize the girls’ individuality and provide tailored plans that build on their strengths. This PowerPoint presentation summarizes the study.

| NCCD

Girls and women represent growing segments of the justice-involved population. Justice-involved girls and women have distinct challenges—such as high levels of trauma, abuse, family issues, substance use, and mental health issues—that need specialized treatment and intervention.

| Caroline Glesmann | Angela Irvine

In order to address the lack of gender-responsive resources for justice-involved girls in Stanislaus County, California, the Prison Law Office in Berkeley partnered with the Stanislaus County Probation Department to develop the Girls Juvenile Justice Initiative. Progress made by the initiative, which began in late 2009, was eventually evaluated by NCCD. This report and executive summary detail the results of this process and outcome evaluation of the initiative, which are meant to inform other counties interested in implementing a gender-responsive approach to meeting girls’ needs in their jurisdictions.

| Caroline Glesmann | Angela Irvine

In order to address the lack of gender-responsive resources for justice-involved girls in Stanislaus County, California, the Prison Law Office in Berkeley partnered with the Stanislaus County Probation Department to develop the Girls Juvenile Justice Initiative. Progress made by the initiative, which began in late 2009, was eventually evaluated by NCCD. This report and executive summary detail the results of this process and outcome evaluation of the initiative, which are meant to inform other counties interested in implementing a gender-responsive approach to meeting girls’ needs in their jurisdictions.

| Francine T. Sherman | Richard A. Mendel | Angela Irvine

In 2005, the Annie E. Casey Foundation published Detention Reform and Girls: Challenges and Solutions, the thirteenth installment in its "Pathways to Detention Reform" publication series. The report showed that while girls comprise a minority of youth who appear in juvenile courts on delinquency charges, they often present vastly different challenges than boys. The Special needs of girls manifest throughout the juvenile justice process, the report found, but particularly at the detention phase. Servicing girls effectively often requires targeted gender-responsive strategies.

| Dr. Angela Wolf | Livier Gutierrez

Although a substantial number of girls are involved with gangs, gang prevention and intervention services are not designed with girls in mind. As Kevin Grant, a service provider working with girls in gangs, notes, "A lot of the [gang prevention and intervention] programs that are available do not fully support the needs of girls in gangs." Girls in gangs require services that respond to their unique experiences and needs. This NCCD Focus highlights the vulnerabilities and consequences of gang involvement for girls, the service needs of girls in gangs and girls at risk of joining gangs, as well as the importance of addressing these service needs as a critical gang violence-prevention strategy. It also provides examples of how various programs are currently addressing the gender-specific needs of girls involved in gangs.