Rights Relinquished: How 25 Hours Became 21 Years for Jerome Dixon

Our Staff

Rights Relinquished: How 25 Hours Became 21 Years for Jerome Dixon

May 31, 2017 | by Jeremy LoudenbackThe Chronicle of Social Change

By sharing Jerome Dixon’s personal story, this article by The Chronicle of Social Change provides context for a California state senate bill set for a vote next week. If passed, the new law will require a lawyer consult for all juveniles before they can be interrogated or given the ability to waive their Miranda rights. Dixon was 17 in 1990 when he was questioned by police for more than 20 hours straight, without representation, about a murder he says he did not commit. However, he finally confessed to the crime in order to stop the interrogation. Dixon ended up spending 21-plus years in prison before his release in 2011 due to “irregularities” in his case. For more on the topic of youth and their Miranda rights, read NCCD CEO Kathy Park’s op-ed that was published by the Juvenile Justice Information Exchange in May 2016.