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Erin Wicke Dankert

Erin Wicke Dankert

Analytics Program Manager

Erin Wicke Dankert, analytics program manager with NCCD, specializes in data collection, interpretation, and analysis. In addition to navigating complex data management systems to complete ad hoc reports for child welfare agencies, Erin contributes to studies in child protective services, adult protective services, education, and juvenile justice, including risk fit and validation studies, inter-rater reliability studies, and management reports. Prior to joining NCCD in 2006, Erin was employed with the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study at the University of Wisconsin-Madison as an undergraduate research assistant. Erin holds Bachelor's of Science degrees in statistics, psychology, and sociology with a concentration in analysis and research from the University of Wisconsin.

Pronouns: she, her

  
Recent publications by Erin Wicke Dankert:

Erin Wicke Dankert
“With great power comes great responsibility.” I can vividly remember Uncle Ben sharing this wisdom in the movie Spider-Man . While I may not be a superhero buff, this phrase rings true to me. When I’m working on something important, I sometimes hear it quietly in the back of my mind, reminding me of the importance of considering the consequences
Erin Wicke Dankert
Andrea Bogie, MSW

The Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) partnered with NCCD’s Children’s Research Center (CRC) to implement a Structured Decision Making® (SDM®) risk assessment for child protective services (CPS). This actuarial risk assessment will help DFPS to identify families at highest risk of future child maltreatment to inform decisions related to service provision with the goal of preventing the occurrence of future harm. DFPS decided to adopt a version of the risk assessment originally developed for a child welfare population served by the California Department of Social Services. To test whether that version of the risk assessment will work as intended for DFPS, CRC conducted this preliminary risk fit study. The results of the study showed that the risk assessment will work as intended for the DFPS CPS population. A full risk validation study is recommended within three to five years of implementation.

/sites/default/files/publication_pdf/texas_cps_risk_fit_report.pdf
Erin Wicke Dankert
Kristen Johnson, PhD

In 2013, the NCCD Children's Research Center conducted a validation study of the Structured Decision Making® risk assessment used by the California Department of Social Services Children and Family Services Division Child Welfare Services. Currently, 54 of California's 58 counties use the risk assessment, last validated in 2007, to estimate the probability of future child maltreatment among families investigated by child welfare agency staff. These staff use the results of the risk assessment to help inform critical case service decisions. This 2013 California risk assessment validation study examines the current risk assessment's ability to classify families based on their chances of future maltreatment and suggests a proposed version of the risk assessment with revisions that could improve its classification ability, particularly for certain race/ethnicity subgroups.

/sites/default/files/publication_pdf/risk-assessment-validation.pdf
Chris Baird
Theresa Healy, MS
Kristen Johnson, PhD
Andrea Bogie, MSW
Erin Wicke Dankert
Chris Scharenbroch

Since the 1970s, those working in the field of juvenile justice have sought ways to classify offenders by their likelihood of future delinquency—primarily through the use of actuarial risk assessments. As more such assessment instruments were developed and put into use, some juvenile justice practitioners and researchers began raising concerns about the classification and predictive validity of several of these risk assessments. In response to those concerns, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention funded NCCD to conduct a study of eight risk assessments in 10 jurisdictions across the United States. NCCD researchers, in consultation with an advisory board of juvenile justice researchers and developers of commercial juvenile justice risk assessment systems included in the study, compared the assessments’ predictive validity, reliability, equity, and costs.

/sites/default/files/publication_pdf/nccd_fire_report.pdf
Erin Wicke Dankert, Researcher
As part of the NCCD research department, I am thrilled to be part of the analytics services team. We partner with social service agencies in child welfare, adult protection, juvenile justice, adult corrections, and education. Each new analysis presents a new challenge, and it is fun and interesting to use my knowledge of data systems to help these agencies address their needs and achieve their goals.