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Erin Hanusa

Erin Hanusa

Director of Communications and Partnerships
Contact Erin Hanusa

Erin Hanusa joined NCCD in 2007. As director of communications and partnerships, Erin leads strategic communications for the organization, ensuring the quality and consistency of NCCD’s external and internal organizational communications and outreach, as well as conducting issue- and project-specific campaigns. She also oversees fundraising and development efforts for the organization. Erin has broad experience in writing, editing, and publication design for a variety of audiences and users in both print and digital media. She received her MFA from the University of Virginia and her B.A. in English from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  

Recent publications by Erin Hanusa:

Erin Hanusa
Being reported to child welfare is among the most difficult and frightening things a family can experience. So much is at stake for children and caregivers in their interactions with child welfare social workers, who are entrusted with a tremendous amount of responsibility and power. For child welfare workers, too, interactions with families bring high stakes. The need to make good decisions about children’s safety and well-being—whether that means removing a child, leaving a child in the home, or bringing a child back into the home after foster care—is pressing.
Erin Hanusa
The year’s end is a traditional time for reflection. At NCCD, we look at all that we have achieved in the past 12 months, how it reflects our values, and how we can improve to make even more of an impact on the communities we serve in the coming year.
Erin Hanusa, Senior Communications Manager, NCCD
At the National Council on Crime and Delinquency, collaboration is part of the backbone of our work. For over one hundred years, we have sought to translate research to practice: to find out what works in human services and to use that knowledge to improve lives. Whether we are facilitating focus groups on how a city can better serve its survivors of violence; helping a county to develop an evidence-based child welfare system; or working across a state to improve adult protective services, collaboration is always a common thread.
Erin Hanusa, Senior Communications Manager, NCCD
Good stories put us in someone else's shoes. Great stories put a mirror in front of our faces and leave us asking our reflection, What are you going to do about this?
Erin Hanusa, Senior Communications Manager, NCCD
More than half of the men and women who make up the US prison population are parents—a situation that leaves 1.7 million kids feeling the absence of Mom or Dad each morning and night. Children of incarcerated parents often face numerous challenges. They grieve the loss of daily physical and emotional interaction with a parent. They must navigate some period of growing up without that parent’s daily guidance. They experience internal confusion and external stigma about if and how they can talk about their situation with friends and family.
Erin Hanusa, Senior Communications Manager, NCCD
How does what happens inside the criminal justice system affect you? If you’re reading this, it has likely touched your life in ways you’re well aware of. Maybe it’s been the focus of your career in research or advocacy. Perhaps it occupies the bulk of your daily work as a prison staff member, attorney, or judge. You may have been the victim of a crime. You may have been incarcerated. Or you may be the partner, child, or friend of an incarcerated person. For many of us, more than one of these categories applies.
Erin Hanusa, Senior Communications Manager, NCCD
America is searching for answers on how to protect children from violence. And though we must work diligently to fill the gaps in our knowledge, we in fact already know a lot. Late last year, a group of national experts provided a blueprint for all of us on how to keep our children safe and help them heal when violence occurs.
Erin Hanusa, Senior Communications Manager, NCCD
The devastating shooting that occurred last Friday at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, CT, has touched all of us. In the last few days, we have mourned together in our families, schools, and communities, and nationally via television, radio, and the Internet. This stunning loss of life and innocence cuts deeply, even for those not connected personally to the victims and their families.
Erin Hanusa, Senior Communications Manager, NCCD, and Debra Illingworth Greene, Editor, NCCD
After decades of unnecessary, excessive force by Los Angeles County deputy sheriffs within their jails, the system is in the spotlight. System reform began a year ago under the leadership of County Sheriff Lee Baca, but much more work is needed. To enable comprehensive, long-term change, the spotlight now shines even brighter with the recent release of the final report of the Citizens’ Commission on Jail Violence (CCJV).
Caroline Glesmann, Researcher, NCCD and Erin Hanusa, Senior Communications Manager, NCCD
On May 14th, NCCD released “Prison Bed Profiteers: How Corporations Are Reshaping Criminal Justice in the U.S.,” a new report focusing on the disconnect between claims made by supporters of privatization and the true impact of the private prison industry. The report provides jurisdictions, communities, and advocates with information and recommendations regarding slowing the growth of private prisons and improving existing facilities.