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Debra Illingworth Greene

Debra Illingworth Greene

Communications Manager

Debra Illingworth Greene joined NCCD in 2011. In her role as communications manager Debra creates engaging, accessible content in print and digital formats for NCCD's audiences. She also collaborates on writing projects with other staff and produces SDM News, a newsletter for those working in the fields of child protection and adult protective services. Prior to joining NCCD, Debra worked in the magazine industry for 22 years both as an editor and freelance writer. She received her BS degree in journalism from the University of Kansas.

Recent publications by Debra Illingworth Greene:

Debra Illingworth Greene
With summer internship season winding down, NCCD is recognizing the students who have brought energy and fresh perspective to our work over the last several months. For the second summer in a row, NCCD partnered with the Boys and Girls Club of Dane County to bring high school students into our Madison, Wisconsin, office for six weeks. As a vital
Debra Illingworth Greene
An 80-year-old woman with progressive dementia lives with her son and attends an adult day center twice a week. She shows up one day with bruising around her wrists. A 64-year-old man, who uses a wheelchair and lives with his sister, has a hard time getting around their apartment due to the amount of clutter. His sister is not around much to help
Debra Illingworth Greene
When I was young, celebrating Mother’s Day and Father’s Day with my family prompted the same question every year from my sister and me: “But when is kid’s day?” My parents’ answer was always the same: “Every day is kid’s day.” For someone growing up in a safe and stable home, like me, that really was the truth. Now I’ve learned that May is Older
Shanna Dean and Debra Greene
June 15 is World Elder Abuse Awareness Day. Check out this short video that explains what elder abuse is, what the risks are, and what NCCD is doing to help elders and vulnerable adults across the country live safer lives.
Debra Illingworth Greene, Editor, NCCD
Schoolteachers in the United States do much more than teach academics—classroom management and student discipline are also important components of their job. But how do they decide who to discipline, with what disciplinary tool, and for what reasons? A comprehensive study conducted in Texas found that only 3% of disciplinary actions in the state’s public schools were the result of behaviors requiring suspension or expulsion by state law; the rest were made at the discretion of school officials.
Debra Illingworth Greene, Editor, NCCD
A photograph of a great gray owl that made local headlines earlier this year for its rare appearance near Madison, Wisconsin, now hangs on the wall of the Child Protection Service (CPS) meeting room in Singapore.
Debra Illingworth Greene, Editor, NCCD
The numbers are daunting: 676,569 children in the United States were victims of child abuse and neglect in 2011 according to the Children’s Bureau of the US Department of Health and Human Services . 1 It can be difficult to grasp the reality of those numbers. It may help to think about the statistic differently—as 9.1 victims per 1,000 children. Can you better imagine what that means in terms of the number of children in your community who are abused and neglected each year?
Erin Hanusa, Senior Communications Manager, NCCD, and Debra Illingworth Greene, Editor, NCCD
After decades of unnecessary, excessive force by Los Angeles County deputy sheriffs within their jails, the system is in the spotlight. System reform began a year ago under the leadership of County Sheriff Lee Baca, but much more work is needed. To enable comprehensive, long-term change, the spotlight now shines even brighter with the recent release of the final report of the Citizens’ Commission on Jail Violence (CCJV).
Vanessa Patino Lydia and Debra Illingworth Greene, Editor, NCCD
This post by NCCD's Vanessa Patino Lydia and Debra Illingworth Greene is a guest entry for Reclaiming Futures ' online blog. “Girls get judged too much—it’s OK for guys to get into trouble because they’re guys, but not for girls; this is not fair.” “The system didn’t realize that the whole family was scared and didn’t understand what was happening.”