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California Cities Gang Prevention Network Bulletin (Bulletin 3)

| Dr. Angela Wolf, Jack Calhoun

NCCD and the National League of Cities' Institute for Youth, Education, and Families (YEF Institute) present the bulletin for the California Cities Gang Prevention Network. This initiative creates a network of major California cities to combat gang violence and victimization.

US Rates of Incarceration: A Global Perspective (FOCUS)

| Christopher Hartney

This fact sheet makes simple side-by-side comparisons of the most reliable and current statistics from around the world to illuminate the extreme use of incarceration in the United States.

California Cities Gang Prevention Network Bulletin (Bulletin 2)

| Dr. Angela Wolf, Jack Calhoun

NCCD and the National League of Cities' Institute for Youth, Education, and Families (YEF Institute) present the bulletin for the California Cities Gang Prevention Network. This initiative creates a network of major California cities to combat gang violence and victimization.

California Cities Gang Prevention Network Bulletin (Bulletin 1)

| Dr. Angela Wolf, Jack Calhoun

NCCD and the National League of Cities' Institute for Youth, Education, and Families (YEF Institute) present the bulletin for the California Cities Gang Prevention Network. This initiative creates a network of major California cities to combat gang violence and victimization.

Minnesota Risk Assessment Validation 2006: A Prospective Study

| Kristen Johnson, PhD, Theresa Healy, MS, Dennis Wagner, PhD, Chris Scharenbroch

Minnesota’s Department of Human Services (DHS) contracted with the Children’s Research Center (CRC), a division of the National Council on Crime and Delinquency (NCCD), to conduct a validation study of the risk assessment used to assess the likelihood of future child maltreatment among families investigated or assessed by DHS. The objective was to assess how well the current risk assessment estimates future maltreatment and, if necessary, propose revisions to improve its classification abilities. The sample included families assessed using an alternative response (currently know as family assessment response) as well as the traditional method. The report reviews the performance of the current risk assessment, then reviews findings for a proposed risk assessment that will replace the current risk assessment.

Reducing the Incarceration of Women: Community-Based Alternatives

| Dr. Angela Wolf

Typically nonviolent low-level offenders, women have been hit particularly hard by California's sentencing and correctional policies and practices. In a system that was designed to respond to male offenders, few programs are available to respond to the unique needs of women prisoners. This special report from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency explains the issues surrounding the incarceration of women, and offers recommendations for reform.

Bridging Community, Research, and Action: An Emerging Center on Latino Youth Development

| Angela Gallegos-Castillo, Vanessa Patino

This NCCD FOCUS is an update on the community conversations held across California with Latino community stakeholders on the status of Latino youth and the creation of a Center on Latino Youth Development.

Task Force on California Prison Crowding

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

This report offers policy and program options to be considered in the Special Session of the Legislature on the severe problems in California prisons.

NCCD Focus: A Rallying Cry for Change (Executive Summary)

| Vanessa Patino, Lawanda Ravoira, Dr. Angela Wolf

An Executive Summary of the report "A Rallying Cry for Change: Charting a New Direction in the State of Florida's Response to Girls in the Juvenile Justice System."

A Rallying Cry for Change: Charting a New Direction in the State of Florida's Response to Girls in the Juvenile Justice System (Full Report)

| Vanessa Patino, Lawanda Ravoira, Dr. Angela Wolf

The National Council on Crime and Delinquency (NCCD) was funded by the Jessie Ball duPont Fund to conduct an independent research study of girls in the Florida juvenile justice system in order to inform a comprehensive approach to gender-specific juvenile justice programming. This report presents new research findings on the pathways of girls into the Florida juvenile justice system and identifies their treatment needs. Additionally, it furthers the discussion about an essential set of services and a system of care that meets the multiple needs of girls in the juvenile justice system. The research supports change in the response to girls, both in treatment services and in policy/system changes that are needed to increase success with the girls. This research should be of interest to every child advocate, Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) staff from prevention to residential, lawmakers, law enforcement, judges, and concerned Florida citizens. The NCCD research sample includes a total of 319 girls in the Florida system -- 244 girls from 13 different residential DJJ programs (low, moderate, high, and maximum risk) and 75 girls from six non-residential programs (PACE Centers). NCCD used its Juvenile Assessment and Intervention System (JAIS) interview instrument to learn more about girls in the system at the aggregate level, including their intervention needs and risk level of offending, and also to suggest supervision strategies for working with them. NCCD also conducted focus groups with staff to better understand the gaps in services and barriers to implementation. The following is a summary of the major findings and recommendations of the final report.

A Rallying Cry for Change: Charting a New Direction in the State of Florida's Response to Girls in the Juvenile Justice System (Full Report)

| Vanessa Patino, Lawanda Ravoira, Dr. Angela Wolf

The National Council on Crime and Delinquency (NCCD) was funded by the Jessie Ball duPont Fund to conduct an independent research study of girls in the Florida juvenile justice system in order to inform a comprehensive approach to gender-specific juvenile justice programming. This report presents new research findings on the pathways of girls into the Florida juvenile justice system and identifies their treatment needs. Additionally, it furthers the discussion about an essential set of services and a system of care that meets the multiple needs of girls in the juvenile justice system. The research supports change in the response to girls, both in treatment services and in policy/system changes that are needed to increase success with the girls. This research should be of interest to every child advocate, Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) staff from prevention to residential, lawmakers, law enforcement, judges, and concerned Florida citizens. The NCCD research sample includes a total of 319 girls in the Florida system -- 244 girls from 13 different residential DJJ programs (low, moderate, high, and maximum risk) and 75 girls from six non-residential programs (PACE Centers). NCCD used its Juvenile Assessment and Intervention System (JAIS) interview instrument to learn more about girls in the system at the aggregate level, including their intervention needs and risk level of offending, and also to suggest supervision strategies for working with them. NCCD also conducted focus groups with staff to better understand the gaps in services and barriers to implementation. The following is a summary of the major findings and recommendations of the final report.

Community Survey on Public Safety

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

Crime in the United States has significant impacts on the health and well-being of individuals. Adults and children, who live in unsafe neighborhoods, whether this sense is perceived or actual, are less likely to engage in social activities in their neighborhoods thus increasing their levels of isolation; they are also less likely to participate in physical activities such as walking in their neighborhoods or enjoying their parks. Thus it is not surprising to find that communities with high crime rates also suffer from disproportionate higher rates of premature mortality due to chronic conditions such as obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes among others. Promoting public safety is an important factor in securing the well-being of communities. To understand the extent to which individuals and their families feel safe in their neighborhoods, the San Francisco Safety Network, a citywide partnership that utilizes district-based Community Organizers to build the capacity of neighborhoods to reduce crime and increase public safety, organized, and implemented a comprehensive survey of community perceptions of safety in San Francisco. The survey was implemented in April 2006 by organizers throughout the different neighborhoods. Additionally, an on-line version of the survey was launched to reach out to the diverse community sectors throughout San Francisco. A total of 2,379 surveys were completed by individuals throughout San Francisco over a one month period (March-April 2006).