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| NCCD

This is the second semi-annual report issued by the Monitors, which covers the monitoring activities that have taken place during this reporting period and describes our observations as to the progress of Los Angeles County and the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department (LASD) in meeting the requirements of the Settlement Agreement (SA) for the Antelope Valley (AV). This report is primarily focused on work undertaken between December 2015 and June 2016. 

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

As per paragraph 171 of the Settlement Agreement between the Parties, the Monitoring Team submits this initial semiannual report, dated December 22, 2015. In August 2011, the US Department of Justice (DOJ), Civil Rights Division, launched an investigation of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department (LASD) in response to complaints and allegations of violations of the Fair Housing Act in the Antelope Valley, California. Upon completion of their investigation in June 2013, the DOJ issued a letter documenting their findings that the LASD's Lancaster and Palmdale Stations had engaged in a pattern and practice of conducting stops, searches, and seizures that were unreasonable and in violation of the Constitution and federal law. Additionally, the DOJ concluded there was evidence of discrimination against African Americans in the enforcement of the Housing Choice Voucher Program (commonly known as Section 8), which is a violation of the Fair Housing Act. 

| Angie M. Wolf, Caroline Glesmann, Angie Del Prado Lippman, Estivaliz Castro

NCCD was commissioned by The California Wellness Foundation and the City of Richmond, California, to conduct a process evaluation of the Office of Neighborhood Safety (ONS), located in Richmond. This evaluation report describes the ONS’s strategies and processes, with a focus on the office’s Operation Peacemaker Fellowship. This report also provides the ONS with feedback from stakeholders and recommendations for continued work in the Richmond community and in the broader field of violence prevention.

| Angie M. Wolf, Caroline Glesmann, Angie Del Prado Lippman, Estivaliz Castro

This document presents highlights of NCCD’s process evaluation of the Office of Neighborhood Safety (ONS). NCCD was commissioned by The California Wellness Foundation and the City of Richmond, California, to conduct a process evaluation of the ONS, located in Richmond. This evaluation report describes the ONS’s strategies and processes, with a focus on the office’s Operation Peacemaker Fellowship. This report also provides the ONS with feedback from stakeholders and recommendations for continued work in the Richmond community and in the broader field of violence prevention.

| Winnie Ore | Christopher Baird

Recent literature on best practices in correctional assessment focuses on three objectives: Resources should target high-risk offenders; programs should address needs related to each offender’s criminal behavior; and case plans should employ strategies that reflect the learning style, motivation, capacities, and circumstances of each offender. Most assessment systems target high-risk offenders. However, standard risk and needs assessments do not necessarily identify needs that are truly criminogenic for each individual; nor do they address responsivity. This is because these systems do not inherently identify either specific strategies and programs that reflect the learning style of the offender or approaches and programs most likely to motivate each offender to change behavior. This paper describes a comprehensive approach to assessment, developed by NCCD, that successfully addresses all three objectives listed above.

| Marilyn Barnes | Angela Irvine | Natalie Ortega

In order to address the wide range of risk levels and needs within the formerly incarcerated population, the Santa Clara County Reentry Network, in collaboration with NCCD, has developed a five-year strategic plan for adult reentry services. Following evidence-based practices, this plan establishes the need to assess the risk and need levels of county prisoners and probationers and focuses reentry resources on those who are at moderate and high risk of committing new crimes. This plan also highlights the importance of using individualized reentry case planning and providing trauma-informed services. 

| Marilyn Barnes | Angela Irvine | Natalie Ortega

This publication is a four page summary of a full report on a five-year strategic plan for adult reentry services in Santa Clara put together by NCCD and the Santa Clara Country Reentry Network.

| Fabiana Silva | Christopher Hartney

Founded in 1997, the California-based Insight Prison Project (IPP) is a nonprofit community-based organization committed to the design and implementation of rehabilitative programs tested within San Quentin State Prison. San Quentin is California's oldest and best-known correctional
institution. The prison today includes life-sentenced and detriment-sentenced adult males. IPP programs are designed for incarcerated populations to develop insight and awareness about their emotions, behaviors, and motivations; practice new skills; and integrate these new skills into all aspects of their lives in order to correct entrenched negative behavioral patterns. IPP's programs focus on a socialization process, a process of transformational re-education, that is designed to bring about a shift in ingrained patterns of harmful and destructive behavior; enable men to make life-enhancing choices; and then integrate them into lasting, positive behavior. Together, the qualitative and quantitative results of this study indicate that IPP's programs offer a number of promising strategies to improve well-being and reduce violence, but also suggest that longer participation in IPP programming is associated with the desired cognitive behavioral outcomes. 

| Dr. Angela Wolf

This report summarizes the findings of NCCD’s process evaluation of the California Cities Gang Prevention Network, a 13-city initiative that aims to reduce gang violence and victimization, mortality, and morbidity, and to develop a statewide policy agenda to abet promising local efforts. The report ascertains the role and function of the Network for cities, as well as strengths and areas in need of improvement. One of the greatest lessons revealed by the process evaluation was the key to successfully developing and implementing a comprehensive strategy.

| Christopher Hartney | Caroline Glesmann

Reported crime is at the lowest level in decades, safe alternatives to incarceration are an accepted part of the corrections system, and private prisons have not provided the cost savings and improved conditions of confinement that their proponents promise. Nevertheless, business is booming for prison companies. Since their start in the 1980s, private prisons have come to hold 8% of all U.S. state and federal prisoners, including half of federal immigration detainees. A steady flow of inmates has meant huge profits for these companies. Just as steady have been the reports of abuse and neglect, poor management of inmate needs, and poor governmental oversight.

| NCCD Center for Girls and Young Women

Contrary to official records and statistics, a large number of girls involved in the justice system have been pregnant. In a study of girls in Florida, according to case review data, 8% reported pregnancy in their lifetime. However, when girls were interviewed, 24% reported they had been pregnant (Acoca & Dedel, 1998). Other studies corroborate these findings and demonstrate that of the almost 30% of girls who reported lifetime pregnancy, 16% had been pregnant while incarcerated. Teen pregnancy presents a number of challenges, which increase exponentially for females who are incarcerated. One of the most archaic and dangerous practices includes the shackling of pregnant girls and women.

| Kristen Johnson, PhD | Raelene Freitag | Christopher Baird

The Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP) recently released a brief report on whether or not implementation of a risk assessment reduced racial disproportionality. This response to the report briefly reviews the findings, critiques the relevance of the research hypotheses, and describes limitations of the research design that undermine the credibility of the conclusions drawn from the study. It also describes a more comprehensive approach to reducing racial disparity and evaluating the success of these efforts.