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| Angie M. Wolf, PhD; Caroline Glesmann

NCCD has published a brief that draws on data from NCCD’s interviews with 114 gang-involved girls and young women in California, with a focus on interview participants’ social supports. The interviews were part of NCCD’s research into the individual, family, and community factors affecting girls’ experiences with and desistance from gangs and gang-related crime. The goals of NCCD’s study, conducted from 2012 to 2015, included identifying girls’ reasons for joining gangs, their experiences and activities related to gang involvement, and their motivations and strategies for transitioning away from gangs.

| Angie M. Wolf, PhD; Andrea Bogie; Estivaliz Castro; Caroline Glesmann; Aishatu Yusuf

This executive summary presents key findings from NCCD’s interviews with 114 gang-involved girls and young women in California from 2012 to 2015. The interviews were part of NCCD’s research into the individual, family, and community factors affecting girls’ experiences with and desistance from gangs and gang-related crime. The goals of NCCD’s study included identifying girls’ reasons for joining gangs, their experiences and activities related to gang involvement, and their motivations and strategies for transitioning away from gangs. The summary also provides recommendations for practitioners, policymakers, and others who are interested in improving outcomes for gang-involved girls.

| Chris Baird

In this final brief, Chris Baird summarizes the major problems identified throughout the series regarding risk assessment models, then goes on to suggest four steps toward remedying those problems. 

| Chris Baird

Brief five of six discusses the research behind structured professional judgment (SPJ) models, a less structured approach to risk assessment favored by the justice field. In this brief, Chris Baird addresses concerns with the validity, reliability, equity, and utility of SPJ models.

| Chris Baird

This brief explores the research behind many current models, discusses methods commonly used to measure “predictive power,” and outlines what is required to measure the efficacy of various approaches to risk assessment.

| Chris Baird

The third brief in this series by Chris Baird identifies flaws in the logic employed to support the use of criminogenic needs (or dynamic risk factors) in risk assessment. While assessing needs is a critical component of assessment, much of what is advocated combines the roles of group data and the actual treatment needs of the individual. This brief also discusses the appropriate role of needs assessment in case planning and service delivery.

| NCCD

This handout concisely explains the benefits of the Structured Decision Making® (SDM) system for each level of an agency: leadership, managers and supervisors, workers, and families. Take a look at the handout and feel free to use it to help communicate SDM® system basics.

| Chris Baird

The second piece in Chris Baird’s six-part series explores the origins of claims that each succeeding “generation” of assessment models in the justice field offers greater “predictive” capacity to its users. Baird goes on to discuss the promotional strategies that led to widespread acceptance of the “generations” terminology and associated claims.

| NCCD

The January 2017 issue of NCCD News includes a video of the keynote address by Dr. William C. Bell at the 2016 NCCD Conference on Children, Youth, and Families; new staff to focus on community violence prevention; a new juvenile justice project in Texas; and more. *This link opens slowly; please be patient.

| Chris Baird

In the first of his six-part series of briefs titled A Question of Evidence, Part Two, Chris Baird explains his reasons for revisiting the topic of his 2009 paper, A Question of Evidence: A Critique of Risk Assessment Models in the Justice System. According to Baird, the issues addressed in his earlier paper “remain in force today, further complicated by increased expectations emanating from new methods of analysis.

| Estivaliz Castro, Caroline Glesmann

A recent NCCD study examined how and why girls become gang-affiliated and how and why some girls avoid or leave gang activity. The study includes information about addressing the needs of gang-involved/formerly gang-involved girls and recommends that services recognize the girls’ individuality and provide tailored plans that build on their strengths. This PowerPoint presentation summarizes the study.

| NCCD