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Exploring a Pay for Success Model to Prevent Juvenile Justice System Involvement for Youth in the Child Welfare System - A Feasibility Assessment Report

March 30, 2015
 National Council on Crime and Delinquency   

In December 2013, The California Endowment funded the National Council on Crime and Delinquency (NCCD) and Third Sector Capital Partners, Inc. (Third Sector) to conduct a feasibility analysis to identify and define the need for delinquency prevention services among a child welfare population to better understand its potential for a Pay for Success (PFS) project. NCCD and Third Sector focused this feasibility analysis on San Diego County, California, where the county had recently implemented the Georgetown University Center for Juvenile Justice crossover practice model for serving youth who are dually involved in both the child welfare and juvenile justice systems. As a way to build on these efforts, the San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency and Child Welfare Services expressed interest in undertaking PFS exploration activities related to interventions that could prevent the occurrence of youth crossover from child welfare to juvenile justice, beginning with an analysis to identify the target population.

Exploring a Pay for Success Model to Prevent Juvenile Justice System Involvement for Youth in the Child Welfare System - Highlights

March 30, 2015
 National Council on Crime and Delinquency   

This document presents highlights of the feasibility study conducted by NCCD and Third Sector Capital Partners, Inc. to determine the potential of preventing juvenile justice system involvement for youth in the child welfare system as a Pay for Success project. To read the full feasibility report, click here.

Scaling Restorative Community Conferencing Through a Pay for Success Model: A Feasibility Assessment Report

March 27, 2015
 National Council on Crime and Delinquency   

In December 2013, The California Endowment funded the National Council on Crime and Delinquency (NCCD) and Third Sector Capital Partners, Inc. to conduct a feasibility study on restorative community conferencing (RCC) to better understand its potential for a Pay for Success (PFS) project. An analysis of available data gathered since 2012 has revealed that of the young people who completed Alameda County’s RCC program, 26.5% were rearrested compared with 45.0% of a matched sample of youth whose cases were processed through the juvenile justice system. Notably, only 11.8% of the RCC youth were subsequently adjudicated delinquent— that is, determined by the court to have committed another delinquent act—compared with 31.4% of the matched sample of youth whose cases were processed through the juvenile justice system. Of participating crime victims, 99% stated they would participate in another RCC. This program also carries significant cost-saving potential, as these lower rates of reoffending combine with a one-time cost of $4,500 per RCC versus $23,000 per year for a youth on probation. With such promising data, NCCD and Third Sector sought to better understand how RCC could be scaled through a PFS project and what capacity building would need to take place for such a project to be feasible. The results of this analysis are detailed in the feasibility report.

Scaling Restorative Community Conferencing Through a Pay for Success Model: Highlights

March 27, 2015
 National Council on Crime and Delinquency   

This document presents highlights of the feasibility study conducted by NCCD and Third Sector Capital Partners, Inc. to determine the potential of restorative community conferencing (RCC) as a Pay for Success project. To read the full feasibility report, click here.

2015 Spring Webinar – Observational Measures of Elder Self-Neglect

March 9, 2015
Dr. Madelyn  Iris 
Dr. Kendon Conrad 

Elder self-neglect (ESN) represents half or more of all cases reported to adult protective services. ESN directly affects older adults and also their families, neighbors, and the larger communities around them. ESN has public health implications and is associated with higher than expected mortality rates, hospitalizations, long-term care placements, and localized environmental and safety hazards. This webinar begins by describing results from a study using concept mapping to create a conceptual model of ESN and the items needed to measure it. On this webinar, presenters will discuss findings from a study that resulted in the development of the Elder Self-Neglect Assessment (ESNA). The tool was field-tested by social workers, case managers, and adult protective services providers from 13 Illinois agencies. ESNA indicators of self-neglect align into two broad categories: behavioral characteristics and environmental factors, which must be accounted for in a comprehensive evaluation. Discussion will focus on the clustering of items into the two categories and on the hierarchy of items which should represent severity of self-neglect. (NOTE: the webinar recording begins on slide 3 of the slide handout. Introductory remarks are excluded due to recording technical difficulties). (Materials: slide presentation)

Juvenile Risk Assessments Are a Best Practice—But Do They Actually Work? What the Data Say About Eight Risk Assessments From Across the United States

March 4, 2015
 National Council On Crime and Deliquency 

NCCD has released new graphics that display important data on the effectiveness of risk assessments used in juvenile justice systems around the country. These charts come from NCCD’s study of eight risk assessments in 10 jurisdictions in consultation with an advisory board of juvenile justice researchers and developers of commercial risk assessment systems. In response to concerns voiced by juvenile justice practitioners and researchers about the classification and predictive validity of several risk assessments, NCCD conducted a multisite study that compared the assessments’ predictive validity, reliability, equity, and costs.

Preliminary Risk Assessment Fit Analysis of the SDM® Family Risk Assessment

February 15, 2015
 Erin  Wicke Dankert 
 Andrea  Bogie 

The Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) partnered with NCCD’s Children’s Research Center (CRC) to implement a Structured Decision Making® (SDM®) risk assessment for child protective services (CPS). This actuarial risk assessment will help DFPS to identify families at highest risk of future child maltreatment to inform decisions related to service provision with the goal of preventing the occurrence of future harm. DFPS decided to adopt a version of the risk assessment originally developed for a child welfare population served by the California Department of Social Services. To test whether that version of the risk assessment will work as intended for DFPS, CRC conducted this preliminary risk fit study. The results of the study showed that the risk assessment will work as intended for the DFPS CPS population. A full risk validation study is recommended within three to five years of implementation.

2015 Winter Webinar - Forensic Markers of Elder Abuse and Neglect

January 12, 2015
 Moderated by Kathleen Quinn and Andrew Capehart 

It is often difficult to figure out if an injury or wound is due to elder abuse. In part, this is because many of the normal and common age-related changes mask and mimic signs of elder abuse. "Older adults bruise easily" and "old people who aren't mobile develop pressure sores" are common refrains that may be hard to refute. In this webinar we will review the research and clinical findings that help distinguish forensic markers of elder mistreatment. (Materials: slide presentation) Presenter - Laura Mosqueda, MD, FAAFP, AGSF, Chair, Department of Family Medicine, Professor of Family Medicine and Geriatrics (Clinical Scholar) and Associate Dean of Primary Care, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California 

Practice Guide: Creating a Juvenile Justice LGBTQ Task Force

December 17, 2014
 Bernadette E. Brown 
 Aisha Canfield 
 Angela  Irvine 

As awareness has grown concerning the need to consider sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression in order to provide appropriate treatment and services to juvenile justice system-involved youth, many jurisdictions have adopted policies with respect to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth and their families. This practice guide offers instruction for convening a juvenile justice LGBTQ task force charged with developing such policies and/or establishing community relationships that result in LGBTQ youth and family access to supportive resources. This is the first in NCCD's series of practice guides and reports regarding LGBTQ youth in the juvenile justice and child welfare systems. The entire series will be posted here.

Webinar: Using Pay for Success to Address Racial Disparities in Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice

November 20, 2014
 Kathy Park 
 Deirdre O'Connor 

Racial disparities in child welfare and juvenile justice systems are prevalent throughout the nation. This webinar provides an overview of Pay for Success and discuss an upcoming opportunity for using it to address these disparities in these systems. NCCD's Social Innovation Fund Pay For Success project is also discussed, including the scope of eligible applicants and a timeline for release of its RFP. Click here to view the presentation.